A Thousand Bits of Kit

Sky life: advice for living in the sky

Sky life

One of my favourite movies is that George Clooney classic, Up in the Air. George plays Ryan Bingham, a frequent flyer with millions of miles under his belt. As he says, “Last year I spent 322 days on the road, which means I had to spend 43 miserable days at home.”

Living in hotels, airport terminals, and yes, up in the air, demands certain skills and equipment. If you are going to thrive rather than merely survive, that is. There’s a friction about travel. The queues, the delays, the check-ins, the routines, the eternal hassling with clerks and taxi drivers. 

Retro shooter: Fujifilm X-T20

Retro shooter

The Traveling Boomer is a blog I’ve been following for a good many years. Paul piqued my interest with this post about a travel camera, a modest mirrorless from Fuji. It certainly looks the part, a very handsome retro SLR look. He says it has a rangefinder style, but with that chunky prism hump, it’s definitely channelling the single lens reflex cameras of yesteryear.

Twinned chimney pots on Gaudi house in Barcelona. Show me a good time.

Show me a good time

Here’s a bit of a giggle and a new approach to travel hacking. Using Tinder when you’re on the road to find the sweetest parts of a new city.

The only times I’ve been to Barcelona, I’ve had my wife with me, and um, I don’t have a Tinder account anyway, but what the hey. For those who are young, single, and looking for a good time, this may be the way to match up with a good guide and a foot massage king.

Just be careful not to put a foot wrong along the way, otherwise you might end up flat on your back re-examining your strategy.

Travel insurance on hand

Travel insurance on hand

Phillipe Cousteau – yes, grandson of the legendary ocean explorer – tells the South China Morning Post his best travel tips. Headlining the article is one that will surely raise a few eyebrows: wearing a good watch while traveling is like having a “Get Out of Jail Free” card. In a sticky situation, you can barter it to get out of trouble.

I’m kind of dubious about this. Yes, I can see how it would work, but it might also attract thieves and muggers. And what’s to stop some crooked cop or customs official from manufacturing a problem that could only be solved by a timely present?

The rest of the article is great advice. This bloke travels a lot and knows what he’s doing.